Impacts of Social Media on your Case

28 Sep Impacts of Social Media on your Case

Certainly by now we know, if you put something questionable on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Instagram or one of the many social media sites, it can and often does, have a negative impact on your image. It isn’t just what your friends think about you. Employers, creditors, landlords and attorneys can see your posts, comments and photos, even when you think only friends can access it.

Social Media is Often Included in the Legal Discovery Process

In an article by John B. Farmer in the February 35, 2013 edition of the Richmond Times Dispatch, Farmer describes a few cases. In one, a man was suing for anguish over the loss of his wife in a truck accident. Unfortunately an inappropriate photo of himself posted on Facebook during his time of mourning undermined the depth of his anguish. As the article states, “In the photo he was holding a beer and wearing a t-shirt that said, ‘I (heart) hot moms'”.

Consequences for Destroying Evidence

To make matters worse, the man’s attorney told him to remove that photo from Facebook, and the man and the attorney suffered consequences of destroying evidence. The man and the attorney were both fined. Once litigation looks possible, evidence cannot be destroyed, and that includes social media and other forms of electronic communication like emails and texts.

Be Proactive with Your Social Media Image

In times of poor discretion, we may carelessly post a photo or statement that can later be used against us. Consider your social media image now and what it would say about you if something bad happened tomorrow. Do not post things that can call question to your judgement and character, and consider the types of organizations you like or follow.

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DISCLAIMER

The preceding material is for information purposes only. The material is not legal advice and does not create an attorney-client relationship. You should consult an attorney for advice on the particular details of your case. Case results depend upon a variety of factors that are unique to each case. Past case results do not guarantee or predict a similar result in any future case.